[games_access] Arcade Sticks with two+ sticks...

Reid Kimball rkimball at gmail.com
Sun Jun 4 19:59:49 EDT 2006


What can developer do to make it easier on people who can't use duel
joystick controllers. It's standard practice in 3rd person games to
make the left stick control player movement and the right stick
control the camera. I personally hate the idea of having to control
two things at once (player and camera) in order to play a game. I
always recommend that we provide an option for the player to choose if
they want to control the camera or not. If not, the camera simply is
fixed to the player character's back.

Are there other solutions developers can consider?

-Reid

On 6/4/06, Barrie Ellis <barrie.ellis at oneswitch.org.uk> wrote:
> Hi Jason,
>
> I totally agree. The amount of games relying on two analogue sticks
> simultaneously is proving to be a huge pain in the back-side for many
> gamers.
>
> There is at least one arcade stick that has two large analogue sticks, that
> works with most modern games consoles. I would imagine it might break your
> lap though, it's a monster. It's the Quasimoto Quasicon. It probably costs
> all your money too(!):
>
> http://www.quasimoto.com/quasicade/quasicon.php
> http://www.retroblast.com/reviews/quasicade_3.html - RetroBlast review
>
> An alternative, is to get a friend to build you your own controller. This
> should be much cheaper, provide you with as many joysticks as you want, but
> will be digital only.
>
> More help here:
>
> http://www.accessibility.nl/games/forum/viewtopic.php?pid=187#p187
>
> Good luck!
>
> Barrie
> OneSwitch.org.uk
>
>
>
>
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "Jason Price" <no1cwbyfan at cox.net>
> To: "'IGDA Games Accessibility SIG Mailing List'" <games_access at igda.org>
> Sent: Saturday, June 03, 2006 9:26 PM
> Subject: RE: [games_access] appealing to developers
>
>
> > Hello,
> >
> > Let me first introduced myself.  My name is Jason Price, 32-year-old
> > lifelong gamer and lifelong person with a disability.
> >
> > I have severe cerebral palsy (spastic triplegia to be specific).  This
> > keeps
> > me from walking and also having normal dexterity in my left hand.  I'm a
> > console gamer through and through, dating back to Atari.  My left hand is
> > not able to hold a standard controller but I have always been able to get
> > by
> > using laptop arcade/fighting sticks.  This all changed in early 2001 when
> > all games began to utilize dual analog sticks as the preferred method for
> > character manipulation.
> >
> > I was immediately excluded from gaming because there are essentially no
> > arcade sticks available featuring two analog sticks and the buttons that
> > are
> > accessed by pressing the analog sticks.  Enough of my rant, there has got
> > to
> > be an answer.  It is very likely that we will find the answer by appealing
> > to both the moral fibers as well as the bottom line for game developers.
> >
> > They must realize that there is a huge untapped market out there.  Gamers
> > like myself play games not only to escape life with a disability, but also
> > to engage our competitive nature.  For example I'm never going to play in
> > the NFL or NBA but through gaming I have in the past been able to
> > experience
> > sports on some level.  Anyway, I hope I'm able positively contribute to
> > this
> > group and I thank you for your time.
> >
> > Jason Price
> >
> > -----Original Message-----
> > From: games_access-bounces at igda.org [mailto:games_access-bounces at igda.org]
> > On Behalf Of Reid Kimball
> > Sent: Saturday, June 03, 2006 1:24 PM
> > To: IGDA Games Accessibility SIG Mailing List
> > Subject: Re: [games_access] Complaint regarding Florian Eckhardt
> >
> > Thanks Kelly for your reply. I too felt motivated after I read
> > comments from people who didn't think games should be closed
> > captioned. People telling me I can't do something tends to be a
> > motivator for me.
> >
> > I also agree that at this time our best option is to appeal to the
> > emotional side of developers if we are going to win their support for
> > accessible gaming. Most developers love gaming and want to share their
> > passion with the rest of the world. Why leave out those that are
> > disabled?
> >
> > A company could also generate a lot of customer loyalty if they make
> > it known they support accessible gaming. A customer who isn't disabled
> > may be supportive of the idea and therefore support the company's
> > efforts by being a loyal customer.
> >
> > -Reid
>
>
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